Cisco OTV (Part III)

This is the final follow-on post from OTV (Part I) and OTV (Part II).

In this final post I will go through the configuration steps, some outputs and FHRP isolation.

OTV Lab Setup

I setup a mini lab using two Nexus 7000 switches, each with the four VDCs, two Nexus 5000 switches and a 3750 catalyst switch.
I emulated two data center sites, each with two core switches for typical layer3 breakout, each with two switches dedicated for OTV and each with one access switch to test connectivity. Site1 includes switches 11-14 (four VDCs on N7K-1) and switch 15 (N5K), whereas Site2 includes switches 21-24 (four VDCs on N7K-2) and switch 32 (3750).

To focus on OTV, I removed the complexity from the transport network by using OTV on dedicated VDCs (four of them for redundancy), connected as inline OTV appliances and by connecting the OTV Join interfaces on a single multi-access network.

This is the topology:

Before configuring OTV, the decision must be made how OTV will be integrated part of the data center design.

Recall the OTV/SVI co-existing limitation. If core switches are in place, which are not the Nexus 7000 switches, OTV may be implemented natively on the new Nexus 7000 switch/es or using a VDCs. If the Nexus 7000 switches are providing the core switch functionality, then separate VDCs are required for OTV.

Continue reading “Cisco OTV (Part III)”

Cisco OTV (Part II)

This is a follow on post from OTV (Part I).

STP Separation

Edge Devices do take part in STP by sending and receiving BPDUs on their internal interface as would any other layer2 switch.

But an OTV Edge Device will not originate or forward BPDUs on the overlay network. OTV thus limits the STP domain to the boundaries of each site. This means a STP problem in the control plane of a given site would not produce any effect on the remote data centers. This is one of the biggest benefits of OTV in comparison to other DCI technologies. This is made possible because MAC reachability information is advertised and learned via the control plane protocol instead of learned using typical MAC flooding behavior.

With the STP separation between sites, the ability for different sites to use different STP technologies is made possible with OTV. I.e., one site can run MSTP while another runs RSTP. In the real world this is a nifty enhancement.

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Multi-Homing

OTV allows multiple Edge Devices to co-exist in the same site for load-sharing purposes. (With NX-OS 5.1 that is limited to 2 OTV Edge Devices per site.)

With multiple OTV Edge Devices per site and no STP across the overlay to shut down redundant links, the possibility of an end-to-end site loops are created. The absence of STP between sites holds valuable benefits, but a loop prevention mechanism is still required, so an alternative method was used. The boys who wrote OTV, decided on electing a master device responsible for traffic forwarding (similar to some non-STP protocols).

With OTV this master elected device is called an AED (Authoritative Edge Device).

An AED is an Edge Device that is responsible for forwarding the extended VLAN frames in and out of a site, from and to the overlay network. It is a very important to understand this before carrying on. Only the AED will forward traffic out of the site onto the overlay. With optimal traffic replication in a transport network, a site’s broadcast and multicast traffic will reach every Edge Device in the remote site. Only the AED in the remote site will forward traffic from the overlay into the remote site. The AED thus ensures that traffic crossing the site-overlay boundary does not get duplicated or create loops when a site is multi-homed.

Continue reading “Cisco OTV (Part II)”

Cisco OTV (Part I)

OTV(Overlay Transport Virtualization) is a technology that provide layer2 extension capabilities between different data centers. In its most simplest form OTV is a new DCI (Data Center Interconnect) technology that routes MAC-based information by encapsulating traffic in normal IP packets for transit.

Cisco has submitted the IETF draft but it is not finalized yet. draft-hasmit-otv-01

OTV Overview

Traditional L2VPN technologies, like EoMPLS and VPLS, rely heavily on tunnels. Rather than creating stateful tunnels, OTV encapsulates layer2 traffic with an IP header and does not create any fixed tunnels.

OTV only requires IP connectivity between remote data center sites, which allows for the transport infrastructures to be layer2 based, layer3 based, or even label switched. IP connectivity as the base requirement along some additional connectivity requirements that will be covered in this post.

OTV requires no changes to existing data centers to work, but it is currently only supported on the Nexus 7000 series switches with M1-Series linecards.

A big enhancement OTV brings to the DCI realm, is its control plane functionality of advertising MAC reachability information instead of relying on the traditional data plane learning of MAC flooding. OTV refers to this concept as MAC routing, aka, MAC-in-IP routinig. The MAC-in-IP routing is done by encapsulating an ethernet frame in an IP packet before forwarded across the transport IP network. The action of encapsulating the traffic between the OTV devices, creates what is called an overlay between the data center sites. Think of an overlay as a logical multipoint bridged network between the sites.

OTV is deployed on devices at the edge of the data center sites, called OTV Edge Devices. These Edge Devices perform typical layer-2 learning and forwarding functions on their site facing interfaces (the Internal Interfaces) and perform IP-based virtualization functions on their core facing interface (the Join Interface) for traffic that is destined via the logical bridge interface between DC sites (the Overlay Interface).

Each Edge Device must have an IP address which is significant in the core/provider network for reachability, but is not required to have any IGP relationship with the core. This allows OTV to be inserted into any type of network in a much simpler fashion.

Lets look at some OTV terminology.

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OTV Terminology

Continue reading “Cisco OTV (Part I)”